Marketing Analysis: There are over 15,000 jobs available and nobody to fill them. But I’m so happy we will once again have plenty of coal.

Yep. 15,000.  That is the approximate total number of jobs that come up when you type in the terms google analytics, marketing data analyst, and advertising data analyst.  Go broad and just type in Data Analyst? 50k. FIFTY THOUSAND JOBS OPEN.

imagesI don’t write often and when I do it’s very obvious I’ve had a bad week. Or maybe month. That something has really “gotten my goat”. Today it is this. Data and the lack of people available to analyze it.

Oh I know – everyone is talking about big data. It will save us, it will kill us, who needs it eventually Watson will be inside every home and he will kick Alexa’s butt to the curb — blah blah blah. But I’m just talking about small data.  The kind of data that organizations who have just really started to pay attention and focus on their digital activities past the number of Facebook followers are now looking at.

Simple data. What is making people sign up at my website? Where is my website traffic coming from?  And it’s smart smart SMART people who can’t figure this out. PHD’s. People who own franchises. People who are qualified to invest your retirement money. People who work with OTHER kinds of data — but not marketing data. Not digital marketing data. I’m talking about people who can’t afford a 15,000 per month attribution system. I’m talking about medium to small sized businesses who are now feel like they have to have Stanford level Master’s degrees to implement a Google Goal Funnel.

Can someone explain to me why Google can’t just open up training centers around the country – physical ones. Not online. Not self motivated. But guided, hand holding training centers to help people get trained on these types of entry level support gigs. For free.  I’m mean it ultimately helps them — the more the world installs GA the more advertising they can sell against it.

But no. We are as a nation focused on reopening coal mines. Nobody talks about the fact that there are in fact jobs and we don’t make an effort to train people to fill them — corporate america doesn’t even make an effort to train people in service of their own needs.

What if corporate America worked like the Army sometimes? Hey – we will send you to college or to a technical training program for two years – but then you sign on and you work for us for 5 years.  How many people would sign on for that? I would have to imagine a lot. Look at the success of Teach For America. Everyone wants to privatize government programs. Private Corporate Data Analyst Scholarship Programs. There’s a program.

Sure we have STEM programs. You can’t go anywhere without hearing how important STEM is….but its not enough. We can’t wait for a 12 year old to make it out of the STEM system and when they do — they will most likely think “I’m going to invent an app and be the next Mark Zuckerberg”. Well…someone has to work for the next Mark Zuckerberg and they are not being trained.  This is a thought that is very related to a great article I read this weekend about how “leadership” is overused and the college admissions community needs to find value in followers too. It’s by Susan Cain, who is my hero as a champion for introverts.

Rant over.

I’m off to see if I can add more solar panels to my roof in defiance of today’s announcement.

 

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Intrapreneurs …. the bravest of them all.

I have been an intrapreneur for practically my whole career. Even before it was called Intrapreneur. It’s really hard sometimes. You find yourself being that innovative and fearless voice in the corner of a large organization (whether you work for the co, or for the consulting co or agency they’ve brought in to play the role). And when you are that person – alot of people just plain out hate you. Your mere existence gives threat to an established world order.

Most people don’t like change. They fight it tooth and nail. I never understand it. Discovering new things, trying new ways – it’s so exciting! It’s like the world is a giant puzzle but so many people just can’t do it.

I absolutely loved this article. Especially the part about integrity. So much of corporate life can be filled with a lot of smokescreens. Watching that succeed has always been so frustrating for me…because I do really believe that authentic integrity is hard to come by these days. And I’m proud I have it. Thanks David K Williams for highlighting the importance.

INTRAPRENEURS
The 4 Essential Traits Of ‘Intrapreneurs’
David K. Williams
Contributor Forbes.com

Intrapreneurs are the heroes of a business environment

There’s been much discussion of late about the entrepreneurs within an organization—those highly valuable executives and team members who will perhaps never become a company founder, but who have learned to apply the essential principles of entrepreneurship to the roles they fill within a company.

We refer to these employees as “intrapreneurs” because they’re not entering into their own, work venture, but they are working within your company, thus the “intra” part.

Our company, Fishbowl is filled with intrapreneurs. They think and behave like owners. Most of them actually are as our organization is employee owned. They are invaluable to the company’s health. But how do organizations recognize and develop intrapreneurs, and, even more importantly, how can you be sure they won’t leave?

As authors Vijay Govindarajan and Jatin Desai have noted in a Harvard Business Review blog post, there are certain characteristics that successful intrapreneurs share. I would like to focus on four of them:

1. Money is not their measurement. Intrapreneurs certainly respect the value and importance of money. They understand the economic drivers that allow the organization to succeed and are able to support this fundamental truth and not fight it. A non-intrapreneur is perpetually looking for non-economic ways to justify their own advancement and payment. An intrapreneur “gets it” and does their work in a way that shows the organization they are someone it can’t afford to lose. The money and advancement finds them.

2. They are “greenhousers.” When you speak about an intriguing idea to an intrapreneur, the idea never leaves them. It germinates within their mind, and they carry with them the desire to figure out how to make it work. When you see them next, they are likely to have grown the seed of an idea into a full-blown plan or they will have created an even better set of alternative plans in its stead.

3. They know how to pivot. Intrapreneurs aren’t afraid to change course, nor do they fear failure. It isn’t outward bravado that drives them but an inner confidence and courage that every step takes them closer to their ultimate goal. In my own training and vernacular I call this phenomenon “failing up.” I celebrate opportunities for growth, even painful ones.

4. They behave authentically and with integrity. Most importantly, intrapreneurs exhibit the traits of confidence and humility—not the maverick behavior of corporate hotshots, Govendarajan and Desai say. I agree fully with this conclusion. Integrity (along with Respect, Belief, and Courage) are key among the traits I call the 7 Non-Negotiables, which have driven my own company to miraculous accomplishments and are at the core of the methodology I describe in my book. A budding businessperson could carry every other characteristic in spades, but without a foundation of integrity, they will fail (and the work landscape is littered with many examples of such failures).

So if these are the traits that describe what an intrapreneur looks like, where will you find these individuals and how can you ensure they will stay?

For starters, a company founded with an entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial emphasis becomes a magnet for more of the same. Employees recommend the company to others who share their values. Like breeds like, which is also to say that a company can’t conduct itself without integrity and still expect to find those traits upheld in its ranks. With time and experience, you will learn to ask the searching questions that will help you determine the true traits of the individuals you consider.

The search will be worth the effort, as tomorrow’s world of work ecosystems will be driven by the increasing ranks of intrapreneurs.

social media and job searching

New Era of Discrimination?

 

The article below caught my eye. Social Media has become such a powerful way for people to express their voices. But consider this: Many of the questions that are illegal for a potential employer to ask you – or at the very least in appropriate – can be answered by looking at your social stream. Are we facing a new era of silent discrimination? You wouldn’t be human if your opinion of a person was not somehow swayed in either direction based on postings about politics, religion, sexual orientation, etc…

Corporate Culture is more important than ever – and Social allows a company to either protect it’s culture, grow it or diversify it in new ways that were not possible prior to the age of personal broadcasting.

Oh the tangled webs we weave…will social just end up being “self filtered”? Where can one express one’s opinion in public without it affecting them in private?

1 in 5 Tech Firms Rejected a Job Applicant Because of Social Media

by , Yesterday, 12:37 PM

Social media profiles are a great way to network and promote yourself, both personally and professionally, but they are also a great way to sabotage yourself with stupid, incriminating content.

And indeed, it turns out that one out of five technology firms has rejected a job applicant because of something they included on their social media profile, according to the 2012 annual technology market survey conducted by Eurocom Worldwide and its associated agencies.

This finding is especially remarkable because a previous wave of the study found that only around 40% of the tech executives surveyed were even looking at profiles of job applicants at all. While that number has probably increased, the fact remains that a large proportion of executives who look at social media profiles are finding something they don’t like.

Mads Christensen, Network Director at Eurocom Worldwide, offered a summary of the findings which makes me want to climb in bed, turn the lights out, and pull the covers over my head forever: “The 21st century human is learning that every action leaves an indelible digital trail. In the years ahead many of us will be challenged by what we are making public in various social forums today.”

More positively for social media, the Eurocom survey also found that 49% of tech executives said they plan to increase spending on social media in the next year. Of course, social media is still haunted by the unresolved question of ROI, as 57% of surveys said they are still unable to measure the impact of social media spending.

Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/170498/1-in-5-tech-firms-rejected-a-job-applicant-because.html#ixzz1ph7bWnKe

gen x boss

Dear Millenial: Here is how to work for a Gen X boss

I’m a Gen-Xer through and through. I am also a latch-key kid. A child of divorce. The oldest. All of these things contributed to my becoming someone who is considered a change agent; someone who can adapt. It was natural that I end up in digital right? I mean really – rules? Confinements? Please.

This also has made me “a cool boss”. I get that you want to and CAN work from home. Or Hawaii or Vegas. I know that you are working at 2am so why in the world would I “admonish you” for showing up on email at 10 and not 8:30? (notice I said on email and not IN THE OFFICE).  As long as you remembered to bring your laptop to Vegas you’re all good.

I get that desks and cubes and such are the butt of every joke and want to provide an open workspace. One that encourages communication, creativity, transparency. Our Social People “space” is a loft – not an office building full of hallways of whispered conversations. And it is referred to as a “space” – it isn’t the “office”. You do not HAVE to be there. Its a place where when everyone needs to come together or we have clients or brainstorming sessions…we have a space. Heck it even doubles as a hotel for our out of town clients and colleagues!

But what I learned this week….what I learned is that my latch-key kid ways, welllll they don’t work well with the 20 somethings on our team. These people are smart, creative, educated – we connect on many levels that they appreciate as being part of boutique and disruptive agency rather than going into a big agency. They like being where there is no guy in his late 50s making 3 million a year down the hall that still doesn’t know how to use facebook. I am not that guy. Or Gal. And frankly I don’t ever plan to be.

BUT – I need to get a little more of that guy in me with certain things because these kids? Man – they are spread THIN! They have no clue how to prioritize. They are so used to doing everything at once – and doing so many things well; that the pressures and demands of delivering real actual value is a challenge for them to understand. “It’s all cool”. Well guess what – it’s not all cool. We have turned the world into this giant popularity contest – and good work, thorough work, is not what is important to them. It’s how cool they look on twitter. Who has the best profile shots, the most followers, who is showing off their wonderful and exciting life in the biggest and brightest way.  When I built one of the first successful online artist centric communities for Nelly, (1mm users baby in 1999!) what we have now is NOT what I imagined “community” to be. I hate popularity contests. Haaaaate. I’m an introvert and thanks to Susan Cain I am now going to be damn proud of it.

But back to the “kids”. What these programmed-to-be-extrovert kids forget?  THE WORLD IS WATCHING.

I’m watching. Our clients are watching. Our potential clients are watching. So this month I had to have a sit down with a 26 year old guy on our team. Why? Because his peers and his work were being affected by his “digital nativeness.” So here are the tips I gave him.

1. Reduce the Swagger

Dude. Nobody needs to know that you were out at some club with some DJ until 2am when we all know that we have a deadline for our biggest client due the next day. We get that 4square is a phenom and we are recommending check-ins and on-premise engagement opps to our clients so people WILL check in on 4square but nobody needs to see it when we are worried that you are on the verge of missing the deadline.

2. Everybody is an Influencer

You, the person next to you, the 4 of your peers on your team. Yes you all have thousands of people that you are connected to and each of you knows the coolest in your own worlds. Play nice. Don’t try and one-up each other. Work it out – and if you can’t? Come complain. Don’t throw a hissy that your colleague is giving you attitude when you have just as much attitude. We don’t have time. Someone is going to be the better person for a part of a project – not everything is the competitive sports that you participated in your entire life while your parents were slaving away at work so that you could have every new Apple product as it was released. Deal with it. The office is not the back seat of a station wagon. Stop fighting for credit. You will get it when it is due.

3. THINK TWICE. TWEET ONCE.

We know that you have been communicating in public your whole lives. (also refer to #1) Twitter is not the place to have an argument, flirt, sext or post party pictures.  This is why that guy at the end of the hall doesn’t think he has to go on Twitter or Facebook. Your shenanigans are making it hard for us to get more budget. You look like an idiot. Stop. We aren’t going to give you a raise if you keep doing it. And I think that you are home working on the deadline we have and you are making me hyperventilate that the more party pics you post the less powerpoint there will be at 2pm tomorrow. PartyPics do not equal PowerPoint. STOP!

4. ASK FOR HELP WHEN YOU NEED IT. HUNT US DOWN.

Unlike your parents that were working and unavailable – we are available – it is our job to be available to you while working.  We may not seem like it because we are very used to being off on our own and “doing our own thing”. We weren’t as lucky as you where we played on 3 soccer teams and had multiplayer XBox. We only had one team in intramurals til 5 and 2 player Atari. Therefore we spent alot of time alone. On the phone. In our bedrooms. HOURS AND HOURS on the phone. Now don’t get me wrong at this point – I have to agree with you. I hate the phone. It wastes time. BUT when things are going wrong or you need help PICK UP THE PHONE. Even though I can see every tweet I can’t read your mind about the presentation that’s due when you are tweeting about how Bon Iver didn’t deserve the Grammy. It’s okay that you don’t know what to do. You’re not going to get in trouble. You already made it through college with a 3.9 and are able to code, draw, write, film and have seen more media today than your great-grandmother saw in her lifetime. You’re fine. It’s okay to say I don’t know, help me.

Thanks for reading. I hope this helps you.

I for one love you way more than I love the guy down the hall; he’s the guy that didn’t think anyone would ever watch a video on their computer let alone the phone, remember? I can’t even believe he is still in the building sometimes! I get you….but he thinks you are INSANE.

But don’t let all that bad press scare you. I’m counting on you.

The guy down the hall is going to crash the Social Security system and I’m expecting a senior citizen version of Couchsurfing/AirBnB to come out from one of your genius heads when you hit 45 and you start to worry about where the hell your parents will get money to pay the medical bills for their robotic eye.

peace out. (ha!)

careers of the future

65 percent of kids born today will have careers that don’t exist yet

finally we might be at the beginning of the end. the doomsday technology chant that educators have been harping on is challenged by a Duke University professor. Why is it that we assume that just because we are older we know better? Why in this day and age with the rapid advancements in health, power (sort of), communication, etc…are we still primarily convinced that technology in kid’s lives is a bad thing? why aren’t we applying moore’s law to kids’ ability to learn and to change the world?

Research shows mobile technology is really changing children’s brains. An expert explains how we use that for good

Our kids' glorious new age of distraction

Children are not what they used to be. They tweet and blog and text without batting an eyelash. Whenever they need the answer to a question, they simply log onto their phone and look it up on Google. They live in a state of perpetual, endless distraction, and, for many parents and educators, it’s a source of real concern. Will future generations be able to finish a whole book? Will they be able to sit through an entire movie without checking their phones? Are we raising a generation of impatient brats?

According to Cathy N. Davidson, a professor of interdisciplinary studies at Duke University, and the author of the new book “Now You See It: How Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn,” much of the panic about children’s shortened attention spans isn’t just misguided, it’s harmful. Younger generations, she argues, don’t just think about technology more casually, they’re actually wired to respond to it in a different manner than we are, and it’s up to us — and our education system — to catch up to them.

Davidson is personally invested in finding a solution to the problem. As vice provost at Duke, she spearheaded a project to hand out a free iPod to every member of the incoming class, and began using wikis and blogs as part of her teaching. In a move that garnered national media attention, she crowd-sourced the grading in her course. In her book, she explains how everything from video gaming to redesigned schools can enhance our children’s education — and ultimately, our future.

Salon spoke to Davidson over the phone about the structure of our brains, the danger of multiple-choice testing, and what the workplace of the future will actually look like.

Over the last few years, there’s been a lot of concern that new forms of technology, like smart phones, video games and the Internet, are ruining the next generation of kids — that they can’t concentrate on anything, that they’re always distracted. You don’t think that’s the case?

Back in the ’80s and ’90s, there were findings that suggested this new technology would be great as an education and learning tool. Then Columbine happened, and you could see all the research money go from “Wow, we’re in this new digital age and it’s going to be great for all of us” to “How is it that this digital era is destroying our kids?” It’s email, it’s the Internet, it’s video games, then when texting comes along, it’s texting, and when social networking comes along, it’s social networking. So whatever the flavor of the month in terms of new technologies are, there’s research that comes out very quickly that shows how it causes our children to be asocial, distracted, bad in school, to have learning disorders, a whole litany of things.

And then the Pew Foundation and MacArthur Foundation started saying, about three or four years ago: “Wait, wait, wait, let’s not assume these things are hurting our kids. Let’s just look at how our kids are using media and stop with testing that’s set up from a pejorative or harmful point of view. Let’s actually look at what’s happening.” So we’ve wasted time — but we can make it up. I think the moralistic research really, really colored over a decade of research, especially on kids.

So tell me, why isn’t all this distraction bad for our kids’ brains?

The phenomenon of attention blindness is real — when we pay attention to one thing, it means we’re not paying attention to something else. When we’re multitasking, what we’re actually really doing is what Linda Stone calls “continuous partial attention.” We’re not actually simultaneously paying equal attention to two things: One of the things that we’re doing is probably being done automatically, and we’re sort of cruising through that, and we’re paying more attention to the other thing. Or we’re moving back and forth between them. But any moment when there is a major new form of technology, people think it’s going to overwhelm the brain. In the 1930s there was legislation introduced to prevent Motorola from putting radios in dashboards, because it was thought that people couldn’t possibly cope with driving and listening to the radio.

As you point out in the book, the reason why certain things distract us more than others has to do with the way our brains develop when we’re young children.

We used to think that as we get older we develop more neural pathways, but the opposite is actually the case. You and I have about 40 percent less neurons than a newborn infant does. A baby pays attention to everything. You’ve probably witnessed this — if there are shadows in the ceiling or sand blades are making peculiar patterns, we adults don’t recognize that, but it can be utterly mesmerizing to a child. They learn what not to pay attention to over and over and over again, and learn what to pay attention to, and that makes for neural pathways that are very efficient. They’re what we tend to call reflexes or automatic behaviors, because we’ve done them so many times we don’t pay attention to them anymore.  As an adult, you feel distracted when you learn something new and you can’t depend on those automatic responses or automatic reflexes that have been streamlined neurally over a lifetime of use.

Younger generations are being exposed to all these new stimuli — texting, Facebooking, Googling — from an early age. Does that mean their brains, their neural pathways, are built differently than ours?

When my students go to the Web and they’re searching and they’re leaving comments and they’re social networking and they’re Facebooking and they’re texting at the same time — those are their reflexes. They are learning to process that kind of information faster. That which we experience shapes our pathways, so they’re going to be far less stressed by a certain kind of multitasking that you are or than I am, or people who may not have grown up with that.

Our tools are substitutes for those things that society has taught us aren’t worth paying attention to and aren’t really valuable — and our neural pathways have followed right along. Back in the days when the slide ruler was invented, people thought it was terrible and you would lose math abilities. Well, they were right, we did lose certain math abilities, and no one cared. So kids today, I think, because of the way they learn, they are used to lots of different media, and they are learning in a different way than kids who were trained by television, for example, in a previous generation. It’s not that one is better or worse than another, it’s just that they’re absolutely different. There’s always something that is easy for a kid not because they’re superior, but because that’s exactly the thing that shaped their neural pathways.

In the book, you have this fascinating statistic that 65 percent of kids born today will have careers that don’t exist yet. Right now, under No Child Left Behind, the school system puts tremendous emphasis on standardized multiple choice tests, which, as you point out, don’t exactly train kids to think creatively about the technological future.

The whole point of standardized testing was invented in 1914 and modeled explicitly as a way to process all these immigrants who were flooding into America at the same time as we were requiring two years of high school, and men were off at war and women were working in factories. The multiple choice test is based on the assembly line – what’s fast, what’s machine readable, what can be graded very, very rapidly. It’s also based on the idea of objectivity and that there’s a kind of knowledge that has a right answer. If you chose a right answer, you’re done. It’s really only in the last 100 years that we’ve thought of learning in that very quantifiable way.

We’re now in an era where anybody can find out anything just by Googling. So the real issue is not how fast can I choose a fact A, B, C or D. Now if I Google an answer I’ve got thousands of possibilities to choose from. How do you teach a kid to be able to make a sound judgment about what is and what isn’t reliable information? How do you synthesize that into a coherent position that allows you to make informed decisions about your life? In other words, all of those things we think of as school were shaped for a vision of work and productivity and adulthood that was very much an industrial age of work, productivity and adulthood. We now have a pretty different idea of work, productivity and adulthood, but we’re still teaching people using the same institutionalized forms of education.

So what do we do to change that?

First I’d get rid of end-of-grade tests. They demotivate learning, in boys especially. Establish more challenge-based problem-solving kinds of education. This is hardly revolutionary. Montessori schools do this. I would like to see more attention paid to how you go from thinking something to making something. If I’m learning about numbers, how will that help me understand the financial situation that no one in the world seems to understand right now. You’re lucky that you’re 27; imagine being 15 right now, and hear every pundit saying that your generation is the first generation to be poorer than your parents, you’re not going to have jobs, we’re going to go into a worldwide depression, and the Internet has made you dumb, shallow, stupid, lonely — that’s a lot to deal with.

One of the things you advocate is getting rid of the traditional grading system in favor of something more group-sourced. How would that work? I find it a little shocking.

There are all these really stunning computer scientists that are just frustrated as heck about how badly we’re training scientists. And many of them feel that A,B,C,D and numeric grades are disincentives to exactly the kind of inductive thinking, creative thinking that is the scientific method. Top Coder is the world’s most important certification system for people who are doing open Web development around the world, and they’ve come up with an incredibly complex badging system, where if I’m working with you on code and I see you’re doing a great job, it’s part of my job as a member of the Top Coding community to give somebody points. So if I think you’re doing a great job solving some problem in C++ that I can’t see a solution to, I might give you 20 points. If I’m a third developer, and I say I really need somebody who can help me with some really complicated stuff on C++ , and I see you have a badge with 1,000 points on it on your website, I can click on your badge and it will give me in minute and excruciating detail, how you earned every one of those points.

There are now a group of computer scientists who are working together to see if we can’t come up with ways that textbooks — particularly online and interactive textbooks; there’ve been some wonderful ones for algebra, for example — could be based on testing that works in some similar way, where a teacher would give you points for succeeding at a problem, where you would automatically get points for getting the correct answer. You wouldn’t even worry about giving negative points because it doesn’t matter; all you do is get points when you do something well. Even saying that is a conceptual breakthrough. When I told my students that we don’t have to worry about trolls and criticism, all we have to do is make really sound, conscientious, articulate judgments about positive things, it was as if a cloud opened.

Work life is also changing. It’s weird, I go to an office every day, and sit at a desk, but as soon as I open my laptop my non-work life floods back in. I’m answering emails from my parents, or checking my Facebook page, or getting texts from friends. Our work life has become very porous.

Right. It’s bizarre — we go to work, and then we live in a workplace that is our desktop, which brings all the whole world to our workplace with us. Why are we going physically to work to then be subjected to everything else in the world that isn’t work along with everything that is work? It’s all jumbled up together. We’re in a very transitional moment. But that’s going to get fixed too, I think grading is going to get more sophisticated and I think we’re just going to have more and more complex ways of working .

Do you think that we’ll just all be telecommuting, eventually?

You know, I love talking about IBM because what stodgier company is there on earth than IBM? There, people are reshaping the workplace to the task before them. Sometimes they physically come together, sometimes they’re in a 15-person phone call, sometimes they’re on their laptops [IM’ing]. I think the dexterity of work is just something we’re beginning to explore. I think you need some really solid infrastructure so it’s not exploitative. It would be great to have universal healthcare because if you had universal healthcare you actually could employ people in variant ways. Like I might want to work 10 hours a week at Salon, and 20 hours a week at NYU, and 15 hours a week at the New York Times. I think flexibility and variability will be more important in the future.

I think basically everybody in the white-collar field has noticed that this change goes both ways — our personal life intrudes into our workplace, but our work is increasing intruding into our personal life. We’re answering emails on weekends or checking our BlackBerrys at night. Is this something we’re just going to get used to?

We could either get used to it, or we could say no. Computers could have software that said how much time I was logged in [and then paid me accordingly]. Why couldn’t that be the new work life? We have to think very carefully about what we want from work now that those new conditions and possibilities exist. That’s why I teach my students about judgment.

Thomas Rogers is Salon’s Deputy Arts Editor.More Thomas Rogers
steve jobs

Thanks Steve. RIP

“Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That’s because they were able to connect experiences they’ve had and synthesize new things. And the reason they were able to do that was that they’ve had more experiences or they have thought more about their experiences than other people.

“Unfortunately, that’s too rare a commodity. A lot of people in our industry haven’t had very diverse experiences. So they don’t have enough dots to connect, and they end up with very linear solutions without a broad perspective on the problem. The broader one’s understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.”

modern job titles

Modern Job Titles

There is always an interesting shift in job titles that happens with every new technology. I’ve been told that my music peers decided at a recent conference that I was the first person to hold the title of VP New Media within the major label community – (1998). The past few days while doing some strategy on resources needed for a growing company i’ve had quite a few aha moments in terms of job titles/descriptions. I thought I’d share –

Sync Soothsayer

understands the syncing of all handheld devices with all gmail, apple mail, outlook and entourage as well as various email providers. understands the syncing of all itunes devices and multiple libraries and data recovery.

Professional Listener

Eavesdropper. Never tweets only watches, searches, analyzes data, tells you what people are saying (this exists but it isn’t called this….quite often it is the dry “analyst” word)

ProStreamer

Your producer role for streaming events. But specifically a producer that understands live streaming, and monitor displays and lighting etc…

AppMaster

Someone who works closely with the Sync Expert in order to identify the best apps for the team to use to improve workflow (evernote? smartr? dropbox? basecamp?) and create some unification across a team for sharing data and information.

four square

Currency: selling names and data to advertisers. Always has been always will.

I still have not joined the foursquare revolution – as me. I’ve checked it out but I’m not ready to broadcast my whereabouts to my network. What if I WANT to sneak off at 4pm for a manicure in between meetings? Does the world really need to know how many cups of coffee a day I consume from my local caffeine dealer?

Still – foursquare is fascinating. And as usual – an advertiser driven revenue model is at the end of the chain. But who’s spending advertising money? We need a new term to describe  “direct to consumer social media marketing advertising that you pay for.” and then convince people to pay for it….i mean we haven’t even converted people to paying for pre-roll or post-roll yet and HOW many hours of viewing time does online video content get?

Foursquare Plots Its Business Model

Dennis Crowley and Naveen Selvadurai of foursquareNEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Don’t look now, but big brands are checking in on Foursquare. Pepsi, frozen-dessert chain Tasti D-Lite and cable network Bravo are all attempting to harness the power of the mobile game/social network.

The question is whether they’ll pay for the privilege. Or whether Foursquare, which has 300,000 users now voluntarily “checking in” at locations, and broadcasting that to their followers, will transcend its current “it” status among the technorati and become a lasting consumer phenomenon — and a marketing tool.

In December, Pepsi made a small bet on the startup as part of its Refresh Everything community-giving push. For every point earned in New York, Pepsi donated 4 cents to inner-city youth center Camp Interactive. After one week, New Yorkers on Foursquare earned 225,000 points, and nearly $10,000 for the organization.

‘Huge opportunity’
It was a small deal with a big brand that generated little if any revenue for Foursquare. Still, it got Pepsi excited about the possibilities.

“From a broad strategy point of view, there’s a huge potential with the ability to connect people to promotional experiences,” said Bonin Bough, PepsiCo’s global director of digital and social media. “We know where people are and can talk to them from a geo-located perspective — that’s a huge opportunity.”

That’s exciting, also, for Foursquare, which in this deal and others is starting to build the foundation of a revenue model on location-based marketing services. Foursquare is planning paid services for three tiers of businesses: small, privately owned stores and restaurants; brands with retail chains, such as Tasti D-Lite; and huge multinational marketers such as Pepsi.

For bigger brands, Foursquare is developing an analytics dashboard so businesses can track who’s coming into their stores. Then, deals could be sold against impressions such as web ads, clicks such as search ads, or a completely new model: cost per check-in.

Moving beyond early adopters
But before it can do any of that, Foursquare must prove it can expand beyond early adopters and educate marketers on how to use the service in ways its fickle users won’t hate.

“We’ve been hesitant to just shoot ad copy through our system,” said Tristan Walker, Foursquare’s head of business development. “Once we start to put in generic specials, we’re just another channel to distribute promotions.”

For now, marketers are availing themselves of Foursquare’s free tools, and some are liking the results. Checking-in in the vicinity of a Tasti D-Lite shop? You may get served a coupon from the Tennessee-based chain, which is testing a free service from Foursquare called “specials nearby.”

“Preliminary data is showing that this is driving foot traffic in stores,” said B.J. Emerson, director-information and social technologies for the 50-store chain. “We’ll most likely pursue this where we can measure effectiveness and return.”

The company also launched a loyalty program that’s synched with Foursquare and Twitter, so customers earn points for making purchases and for checking in. When visits are published to customers’ Twitter stream, Tasti D-Lite gets in front of all their friends, and a customer earns extra points toward free dessert.

Using, not paying, Foursquare
Right now, Specials Nearby — there are nearly 700 since Foursquare launched the feature in summer — are free to businesses. So is the API off which Mr. Emerson built the loyalty program. Likewise, Foursquare’s Bravo deal gives the company TV exposure, if not revenue.

“I think marketers will be interested in Foursquare, assuming the audience keeps growing,” said David Berkowitz, director-emerging media at digital agency 360i. “The lasting value will be from the smaller deals Foursquare will find ways to monetize.”

It’s a difficult balance: Foursquare’s ability to continue to grow depends on its users accepting at least a bit of marketing along with the badges, or honorifics, they earn, such as “mayor” (for most visits), “newbie,” “bender” (for consecutive nights out) and, yes, even “douchebag” (for checking in at places like Barneys).

Zero to 300,000 isn’t bad for an app that launched less than a year ago. It took more than three years for Twitter to reach its current fever pitch. But even as it grows, Foursquare will have to answer the same questions. Research firm Sysomos estimates that 5% of Twitter users generate 75% of activity.

Much will depend on whether it can maintain its cool. “The X-factor appeal of Foursquare is in its social currency,” Mr. Berkowitz said. “Giving Foursquare users these badges for completing explicit tasks adds an element of surprise, like a scavenger hunt. And you can’t ignore the bragging rights.”

2009 – It’s finally here

Happy New Year.

It has been a rollercoaster ride for sure in 2008. But Change Is Good!

I’m looking forward to seeing how creative we all get in the upcoming year.  There are many pundits out there who talk about desperate times as periods of innovation; i like to think that this next year will bring POSITIVE risktaking to our world. It will be interesting —

As always the eternal optimist.

I thought this list from Business Week was rooted in sanity…..so I’m sharing.

Top Ten Business Predictions for 2009.