JWT’s Top 100 Trends for 2015

I say it every year and I’ll say it again this year.

I. Love. This. Report.

A little proud to see Los Angeles’ Image as one of the trends.

Go fellow Angelenos!

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Intellectual Curiosity

“What you need more than expertise is curiosity, someone who’s interested in what’s happening, loves change, and wants to develop ideas and drive change. If you’re not one of those people, you’re going to hate what’s going on in marketing and you won’t be effective.”

great article from author and FORBES writer Dorie Clark.

11/11/2012

The End of the Expert: Why No One in Marketing Knows What They’re Doing

English: Sir Richard Branson at the eTalk Fest...

Richard Branson’s Virgin is one company that’s succeeding in the new era of marketing.  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s a stark verdict from a prominent source. “There are hundreds of thousands of people who were trained and mentored, and studied classical marketing, and they got good at it,” says Clark Kokich, chairman of digital agency Razorfish. Unfortunately, the world has changed – and that education is no longer relevant. “If your self-worth and your confidence is based on you being an expert, you’re in deep trouble, because there aren’t any experts,” says Kokich, author of Do or Die: Surviving and Thriving in a World Where the Old Ways of Marketing Aren’t Getting It Done. “Sure, there are experts in some fields. Someone may be really good in SEO or in mobile. But there aren’t any experts in making this transition.”

In the late 1990s, digital marketing debuted to great fanfare, but it was still fundamentally about advertising to customers. But in the past several years, new social and mobile tools have upended that paradigm. “The focus has really changed,” Kokich told me in a recent interview at the Inbound Marketing Summit, where we were both keynote speakers. “It’s less about advertising and more about creating an experience that transforms what it means to be a customer of a brand. And that change has really caused a lot of consternation in marketing because none of us were trained to do that.”

As a model for the future, he cites the iconoclastic examples of Richard Branson’s Virgin; Nike’s “Write the Future” campaign, in which youth competed to be identified as a rising soccer star; and the “Epic Mix” campaign by the Vail ski resort, which leveraged digital technology to help friends connect, track each other, and compete on the slopes. To succeed in marketing moving forward, he says, “What you need more than expertise is curiosity, someone who’s interested in what’s happening, loves change, and wants to develop ideas and drive change. If you’re not one of those people, you’re going to hate what’s going on in marketing and you won’t be effective. I have friends who have told me they’re just trying to hang on before people realize they don’t know what they’re doing. But I don’t think you can fake it another five years. You’re just not relevant if you’re fighting the reality of what’s happening.”

So how do you begin to “create brand experiences” instead of relying on past methods of advertising? The first step, says Kokich, is to “ask a different question.” He advises companies to pull together a cross-section of company and agency staff – “everybody that’s responsible for building anything that touches the customer” – put them in a room and ask: “What do people hate about doing business with us, and can we use digital to fix it?”

The wrong frame, which too many companies use, is “This is what we are, and how do we shine it up?” Kokich believes more fundamental change is necessary. “We talk a lot in marketing about the importance of being good storytellers. Well, we need to be good story changers, because telling a story isn’t enough. Customers can see right through a great story about a lousy product.”

If you succeed in the new marketing, Kokich says, the benefits can be profound: “Companies like Virgin or Vail fundamentally altered their market position, because they fundamentally altered the way they did marketing.”

mobile advertising

Why Mobile Advertising Works

Business Insider ran this great video of Google’s Tim Reis talking about mobile display advertising and our personal connection our devices. I have to admit – mobile ads are probably second only to outdoor advertising in terms of things I notice/pay attention to at this point. I speed through ads on my DVR, the display ads on a webpage are 80% clutter – I sort of notice the Facebook advertising….when it’s working. When it isn’t it’s just more clutter.

But Tim really pegs it here. Media budgets should be carving out a good amount for mobile and spending time planning since you really can hit the bullseye of the consumer you want to attract.

pinterest for search ranking

Pinterest + Video = Higher Search Engine Rankings

So often SEO seems like this big “secret sauce”. The guy that knows SEO is the like Daniel Bouloud of online marketing. He has the time and temperament to lock himself in the room and play with tiny bits of information – like a gamer really. Which is why it always shocks me that so many folks think that its all SEO. There needs to be content to search – to click through to…to track. SEO is the last piece of the puzzle not the first.

Here is some great info and a few of the early puzzle pieces to think about!


Pinterest + Video = Higher SEO Rankings

Is your marketing department ignoring Pinterest in hopes that it will be just another fad? Did you know that Pinterest is retaining and engaging users as much as two to three times more efficiently than Twitter was at a similar time in its history? Not only is it the fastest growing social media site today, but it is a great value for online video marketing because of its video SEO value.

Pinterest’s traffic is growing exponentially.
ComScore’s statistics for February 2012 revealed that Pinterest may not be just one of those “other social media sites.” Unique visitors increased over 50% from the previous month to 17.8 million. Relevant, keyword-rich URLs are important to increasing your SEO rankings, and as of this writing, video-commerce.org is reporting that Pinterest URLs show up in over 46 million Google search results, including over 1,170 indexed online video URLs.

The way Pinterest works is that each ‘pin,’ ‘board,’ and user profile receives a unique URL.  So each ‘board’ — or category of videos — you create can be titled and tagged with targeted keywords, which Pinterest uses to create a keyword-rich URL. This means that each and every ‘board’ will include your targeted keywords and be indexed by Google so searchers can easily find your video content. The technical explanation is that Pinterest’s file structure is created specifically for managing and categorizing video content so that Google will index the titles and descriptions for your individual boards as key metadata for its own search results.

Pinterest increases Video SEO rankings.
Pinterest knows that online video content is important to consumers because it helps them make informed decisions and is a the most valued type of online content.  And because consumers love online video content, brands are responding. Major national retailers and e-commerce sites such as the The Home Depot, Whole Foods, The Gap, The Vitamin Shoppe, and Target are just a few of the 200,000+ brands that currently use Pinterest to publish online content that includes video, images, and descriptions.

Getting started with Pinterest.
Pinterest is pretty easy to get started with. First, create separate boards for product and/or service categories you want to target consumers with. Even if you only have a small grouping, try to be as granular as possible and use long-tail keywords to help your SEO strategy. Next, use as much of the allowed 500 character-length description area as you can. Include your company’s brand name, the name of the product or services, and as many keywords and as much descriptive information as possible.

Include more than your online video marketing content.
Even if you are new to Pinterest, you will quickly see that the site is very visual. So think about other visuals your company may already have, such as graphs, charts, website images, front pages of brochures, eBooks, and pictures from your facility or company events. Tagged with appropriate keywords, all of this content could then be found on search engines and drive traffic to your website. If you really want to get detailed, you can create dedicated landing pages for each of your Pinterest boards. This way you can track and analyze the traffic you get to each category and be able to better plan your marketing resources.

product development and marketing

Your Roadmap for Product Development and Marketing

This is a snapshot from a FANTASTIC report from Altimeter about Content Marketing and Development. As we move ahead and more and more companies are moving into the Content space (past the traditional press release or white paper) this map is a great thing to hang over your wall.  Does what you are planning to create (mobile app game? Mobile app informational service? blog? video series?) does it fit into one of these bubbles and more importantly; does it fit into the RIGHT bubble?

This is a great one to hang on the wall above the desk and look at during those conference calls about content strategy. Most people don’t really know what content can be – this can help!

You can download the full report here:

Altimeter

social media ROI

Great Points….thanks involver.com!

Three Social Media ROI Myths

Some social media marketing myths still persist despite the growing understanding of how to use the new marketing channels. Here are three of them.

Social Media is NOT free

1. Social media is free.

Signing up for a Facebook page or a YouTube channel may be free, but that doesn’t mean social media is. At the very least, successful social media content still takes time to plan and develop, and someone in the business is being paid for that time. However, the good news is that once a social media marketing strategy has been decided upon and people have been allocated to the project, the cost of social media remains relatively flat, while profitability increases over time. Whether or not profitability happens, though, totally depends upon the success of the social media campaign.

2. It’s impossible to assign a monetary ROI value to social media marketing.

Although marketers are still learning how to measure the ROI of social media efforts, stating that the monetary value of a social media campaign cannot be measured at all is not true. As you will see in the next section of this article, many businesses are already successfully measuring the dollar-value of their social initiatives.

3. Social media costs more than it makes.

This is a “myth” that is actually true–for businesses who are poorly executing social media campaigns because they don’t understand their audience, don’t understand their technical tools, or just don’t understand social media itself. Businesses who do not invest the time it takes to learn about their audience, how to grow that audience, and how to interact with that audience will ultimately spend more on social media than social media brings back to them, but this is not the fault of social media itself.

Six Examples of Social Media ROI

Want to see some recent concrete examples of businesses who are measuring the results of their social media campaigns? Try these on for size:

Social Media ROI

1. Best Buy’s innovative “Twelpforce” enlists knowledgeable, everyday employees to answer customer support questions via Twitter. Best Buy estimates that this “social help desk” saves them $5 million annually in support. [1]

2. Bonobo’s social business became 13 times more cost effective (CPA) in acquiring a new customer from Twitter than from other marketing channels. [2]

3. Paramount Pictures’ #Super8Secret (hashtag) Promoted Trend created a tremendous spike in conversations: Tweets of the hashtag reached nearly nine million impressions in less than 24 hours and mentions of the movie skyrocketed to more than 150 per minute. Receipts for the sneak preview exceeded $1 million, and Paramount said weekend box office surpassed expectations by 52%. [2]

4. Petco’s 1% of shoppers use “Ask and Answer,” that influences a 10% increase of revenue on their website. [3]

5. Sprint’s monitoring of online conversations about their brand enabled them to tweak their social media campaign messaging. As a result, the company says it picked up an extra $133 million in revenue. [4]

6. Sephora Community Users spend 2.5 times more than average customers, and their superfans spend 10 times more. [1]

plug in conference

plug-in conference 1999: strauss zelnick & spotify

One of the first digital music conferences (webnoize getting THE first kudos) was Plug-In. It was held in NYC. In 1999 we were in the basement of the Marriott Marquis. There weren’t that many people. maybe 500? maybe? I had to convince my boss that it was useful for me to go. I was still a part time product manager and that “website stuff” was still not my full time gig although it was only a month later that I became the VP of New Media for Universal Records. I was recently told that I am credited with being the first in music to use that title. I was shocked. But hey – ok. I’ll take it.

So at Plug-In — Strauss Zelnick was the keynote. Universal had a close relationship with BMG due to Get Music but I had not had alot of interaction with that team. So Strauss spoke and delivered an edict about the future. About direct marketing and one to one advertising. About each person being able to choose exactly what they want to hear online and on demand. He actually tells of the end of the album and the rise of singles. And that selling CDs will diminish…. (Now at this point I am also running around with a top teen band 98 Degrees and we are actually trying to deliver a single to radio digitally for the first time — to prevent any one station from playing it earlier than any other station. HA! Those were the days – a “leak” was more like a drip compared to the rushing tidal wave it would later become.)

So as I am sitting there – I think – hmmm. How would my job change if the end goal wasn’t to sell a CD? That is the marker of success. CD sales. Sure airplay was important but it was really just to sell CDs. Soundscan always more important than BDS. But what if….what if Strauss is right and my job ends up having to persuade people to “click on an individual song” more often than another song? Hmmm. How would that work? That essentially turns each person into a programmer. (Does this mean I have to become a radio promotion person? Please god NO!) So what do I do? How does that work?

“Sharing” was not yet the word that it is now. It had just entered the marketing vernacular. It was just starting to become a dirty word as it really meant “piracy”. But i knew then that somehow it was about the one to one relationship, and all the work we were doing collecting emails and building databases.

When did I really and truly come up with the answer to what would I do in regards to what what Strauss was talking about? Last month when Spotify integrated with Facebook. Strauss – you were right.  If you work for a recorded music company or a publisher and you are in marketing – your job is to make someone click on your song more than anyone else’s. In this month’s Rolling Stone there is a great article about payments from streaming services by Steve Knopper “The New Economics of the  Music Industry” . He says that 60 streams of a song generate 38 cents to the artist & label (9.1 to publisher). 60 streams.

That’s damn hard. 60 streams.  I mean – once someone bought a CD who cared how many times they listened to it? Who cared if it ended up cracked on the floor of the car?  But now – now it’s about engaging people. Engaging fans. You can’t just sell to them once. Click Click Click. Its about programmers and trusting someone else – at least for most of us. We need curators. People depend on me to curate food and travel for them. Here is my admission: I depend on others to curate my music.

Yep. I am soooo lazy when it comes to making playlists – there – it’s out in the open. I always was surrounded by the best radio programmers, DJs, music supervisors, boyfriends that owned 5000 pieces of vinyl – I never had to!  I have let my itunes trn into a mess of duplicates, singles, just an abomination. Me – who worked in a record store and spent hours delineating the difference between ambient and trance. This is my secret problem and guess what SPOTIFY IS THE SOLUTION! I can’t stop using it. I wish more of my music gurus would get their butts on their and make playlists (yes I mean you Bob DOuglas).

Dear Blue Note – thank Brian Larson for putting the 100 Best of Blue Note together. I’ve clicked way more than 60 times. Dear Sly Stone – thank Jon Vanhala for including 5 of your songs in his “you got to funkify playlist”. Dear War on Drugs: Thank Josh Nicotra for sending me the link inside SPOTIFY to your older records before we went to your show last Saturday. Dear Ryan Adams – yes that was me that had Ashes on repeat for an entire 2 days when it FINALLY got loaded into SPOTIFY after the release date. That’s gotta be about 60 times right? That’s……60 x .38 x 10 = 228.00 is that right? if i had ryan adams streaming for 48 hours straight and the record isn’t quite an album…right? $228.00? Someone confirm with me please. I’m reallllly bad at math. Really bad. Even WITH a calculator.

My mind is a whirl with all sorts of ways to get people to make lists in Spotify and get them spread around. Click. Click. Click. Ching. Ching. Ching.  It might not be as much as a CD made – but I gotta tell you – I leave the SPOTIFY open all day and even leave it on for the dogs. I must be supporting someone’s livelihood from music even just a little bit right?

Right?

Click. Click. Click.