product development and marketing

Your Roadmap for Product Development and Marketing

This is a snapshot from a FANTASTIC report from Altimeter about Content Marketing and Development. As we move ahead and more and more companies are moving into the Content space (past the traditional press release or white paper) this map is a great thing to hang over your wall.  Does what you are planning to create (mobile app game? Mobile app informational service? blog? video series?) does it fit into one of these bubbles and more importantly; does it fit into the RIGHT bubble?

This is a great one to hang on the wall above the desk and look at during those conference calls about content strategy. Most people don’t really know what content can be – this can help!

You can download the full report here:

Altimeter

social media ROI

Great Points….thanks involver.com!

Three Social Media ROI Myths

Some social media marketing myths still persist despite the growing understanding of how to use the new marketing channels. Here are three of them.

Social Media is NOT free

1. Social media is free.

Signing up for a Facebook page or a YouTube channel may be free, but that doesn’t mean social media is. At the very least, successful social media content still takes time to plan and develop, and someone in the business is being paid for that time. However, the good news is that once a social media marketing strategy has been decided upon and people have been allocated to the project, the cost of social media remains relatively flat, while profitability increases over time. Whether or not profitability happens, though, totally depends upon the success of the social media campaign.

2. It’s impossible to assign a monetary ROI value to social media marketing.

Although marketers are still learning how to measure the ROI of social media efforts, stating that the monetary value of a social media campaign cannot be measured at all is not true. As you will see in the next section of this article, many businesses are already successfully measuring the dollar-value of their social initiatives.

3. Social media costs more than it makes.

This is a “myth” that is actually true–for businesses who are poorly executing social media campaigns because they don’t understand their audience, don’t understand their technical tools, or just don’t understand social media itself. Businesses who do not invest the time it takes to learn about their audience, how to grow that audience, and how to interact with that audience will ultimately spend more on social media than social media brings back to them, but this is not the fault of social media itself.

Six Examples of Social Media ROI

Want to see some recent concrete examples of businesses who are measuring the results of their social media campaigns? Try these on for size:

Social Media ROI

1. Best Buy’s innovative “Twelpforce” enlists knowledgeable, everyday employees to answer customer support questions via Twitter. Best Buy estimates that this “social help desk” saves them $5 million annually in support. [1]

2. Bonobo’s social business became 13 times more cost effective (CPA) in acquiring a new customer from Twitter than from other marketing channels. [2]

3. Paramount Pictures’ #Super8Secret (hashtag) Promoted Trend created a tremendous spike in conversations: Tweets of the hashtag reached nearly nine million impressions in less than 24 hours and mentions of the movie skyrocketed to more than 150 per minute. Receipts for the sneak preview exceeded $1 million, and Paramount said weekend box office surpassed expectations by 52%. [2]

4. Petco’s 1% of shoppers use “Ask and Answer,” that influences a 10% increase of revenue on their website. [3]

5. Sprint’s monitoring of online conversations about their brand enabled them to tweak their social media campaign messaging. As a result, the company says it picked up an extra $133 million in revenue. [4]

6. Sephora Community Users spend 2.5 times more than average customers, and their superfans spend 10 times more. [1]

susan cain the power of introverts

The Quiet Revolution

I found this speech to be incredibly moving. We live in a world where extroverts gain all the credit for having the loudest voices in the room, but not always the best solutions. We sometimes know of the Introvert in a “trusted advisor” role…but certainly not enough.

I hope you will spend the short 18 minutes of time to watch Susan Cain and give the Introvert you work with a little recognition. And, if you recognize yourself in here, that it gives you some comfort and empowers you to be you.

Susan Cain: The Power of Introverts

internet censorship

The day the Internet Died

( █ ) ███ ██████ ██ ████ ██ ████ ██████ ██ ████ ██ ████ ██████ ██ ████ ██ ████ ██ ████ ██ ████ ██ ████ ██ ████ ██.
This comment has been found in violation of H.R. 3261, S.O.P.A and has been removed.

Don’t like what you see?

Tell someone.

http://americancensorship.org/

plug in conference

plug-in conference 1999: strauss zelnick & spotify

One of the first digital music conferences (webnoize getting THE first kudos) was Plug-In. It was held in NYC. In 1999 we were in the basement of the Marriott Marquis. There weren’t that many people. maybe 500? maybe? I had to convince my boss that it was useful for me to go. I was still a part time product manager and that “website stuff” was still not my full time gig although it was only a month later that I became the VP of New Media for Universal Records. I was recently told that I am credited with being the first in music to use that title. I was shocked. But hey – ok. I’ll take it.

So at Plug-In — Strauss Zelnick was the keynote. Universal had a close relationship with BMG due to Get Music but I had not had alot of interaction with that team. So Strauss spoke and delivered an edict about the future. About direct marketing and one to one advertising. About each person being able to choose exactly what they want to hear online and on demand. He actually tells of the end of the album and the rise of singles. And that selling CDs will diminish…. (Now at this point I am also running around with a top teen band 98 Degrees and we are actually trying to deliver a single to radio digitally for the first time — to prevent any one station from playing it earlier than any other station. HA! Those were the days – a “leak” was more like a drip compared to the rushing tidal wave it would later become.)

So as I am sitting there – I think – hmmm. How would my job change if the end goal wasn’t to sell a CD? That is the marker of success. CD sales. Sure airplay was important but it was really just to sell CDs. Soundscan always more important than BDS. But what if….what if Strauss is right and my job ends up having to persuade people to “click on an individual song” more often than another song? Hmmm. How would that work? That essentially turns each person into a programmer. (Does this mean I have to become a radio promotion person? Please god NO!) So what do I do? How does that work?

“Sharing” was not yet the word that it is now. It had just entered the marketing vernacular. It was just starting to become a dirty word as it really meant “piracy”. But i knew then that somehow it was about the one to one relationship, and all the work we were doing collecting emails and building databases.

When did I really and truly come up with the answer to what would I do in regards to what what Strauss was talking about? Last month when Spotify integrated with Facebook. Strauss – you were right.  If you work for a recorded music company or a publisher and you are in marketing – your job is to make someone click on your song more than anyone else’s. In this month’s Rolling Stone there is a great article about payments from streaming services by Steve Knopper “The New Economics of the  Music Industry” . He says that 60 streams of a song generate 38 cents to the artist & label (9.1 to publisher). 60 streams.

That’s damn hard. 60 streams.  I mean – once someone bought a CD who cared how many times they listened to it? Who cared if it ended up cracked on the floor of the car?  But now – now it’s about engaging people. Engaging fans. You can’t just sell to them once. Click Click Click. Its about programmers and trusting someone else – at least for most of us. We need curators. People depend on me to curate food and travel for them. Here is my admission: I depend on others to curate my music.

Yep. I am soooo lazy when it comes to making playlists – there – it’s out in the open. I always was surrounded by the best radio programmers, DJs, music supervisors, boyfriends that owned 5000 pieces of vinyl – I never had to!  I have let my itunes trn into a mess of duplicates, singles, just an abomination. Me – who worked in a record store and spent hours delineating the difference between ambient and trance. This is my secret problem and guess what SPOTIFY IS THE SOLUTION! I can’t stop using it. I wish more of my music gurus would get their butts on their and make playlists (yes I mean you Bob DOuglas).

Dear Blue Note – thank Brian Larson for putting the 100 Best of Blue Note together. I’ve clicked way more than 60 times. Dear Sly Stone – thank Jon Vanhala for including 5 of your songs in his “you got to funkify playlist”. Dear War on Drugs: Thank Josh Nicotra for sending me the link inside SPOTIFY to your older records before we went to your show last Saturday. Dear Ryan Adams – yes that was me that had Ashes on repeat for an entire 2 days when it FINALLY got loaded into SPOTIFY after the release date. That’s gotta be about 60 times right? That’s……60 x .38 x 10 = 228.00 is that right? if i had ryan adams streaming for 48 hours straight and the record isn’t quite an album…right? $228.00? Someone confirm with me please. I’m reallllly bad at math. Really bad. Even WITH a calculator.

My mind is a whirl with all sorts of ways to get people to make lists in Spotify and get them spread around. Click. Click. Click. Ching. Ching. Ching.  It might not be as much as a CD made – but I gotta tell you – I leave the SPOTIFY open all day and even leave it on for the dogs. I must be supporting someone’s livelihood from music even just a little bit right?

Right?

Click. Click. Click.

What Content Do We Need?

I LOVE this. LOVE. LOVE. LOVE. I may wallpaper my office with it I love it so much.

These days a marketing campaign can no longer use the print, OOH, website, TV checklist. Long gone are the days where production on a campaign only meant taking care of 4 channels.

These days you must wrap your message inside content. Its like a subtle way of gaining entry into the mind of your potential audience. Unfortunately there is an inverse relationship here – you have to do the most work for less people – which are your actual consumers.  Think about it – this is the nature of CRM. This is the nature of what all brand marketing needs to adopt.

This grid should really help get some ideas going no matter what type of brand, product or idea you are trying to create awareness, purchase or adoption of….and makes fabulous wallpaper.

100 things to watch

JWT says beer is the new wine (#10)

JWT’s “Things To Watch” is ALWAYS a great way to start the new year with your mind ticking away at new ideas, innovative ways of looking at our daily life and yes, even after all that holiday shopping, build a shopping list.

go get a beer, grap your ipad and indulge in prediction!

it’s so funny how we don’t talk anymore

Pew’s latest information on texting shows that adults are increasing in their use of texting. Some of the subtleties are fascinating. Love the question “do you sleep with your phone” (parents do so more than non parents) There is a definite difference between parents and non parents usage that is interesting but also confusing at times. take a look. One thing is for sure – kids are forcing their parents to communicate with them on their terms – and that’s via text.

Adults, Cell Phones and Texting

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Overview

Texting by adults has increased over the past nine months from 65% of adults sending and receiving texts in September 2009 to 72% texting in May 2010. Still, adults do not send nearly the same number of texts per day as teens ages 12-17, who send and receive, on average, five times more texts per day than adult texters.

  • Adults who text typically send and receive a median of 10 texts a day; teens who text send and receive a median of 50 texts per day.
  • 5% of all adult texters send more than 200 text messages a day or more than 6,000 texts a month. Fully 15% of teens ages 12-17, and 18% of adults ages 18 to 24 text message more than 200 messages a day, while just 3% of adults ages 25 to 29 do the same.
  • Heavy adult texters — those who send and receive more than 50 texts a day — also tend to be heavy users of voice calling. Light texters, who exchange one to 10 texts a day, do not make up for less texting by calling more. Instead, they are light users of both calling and texting.

The original purpose of the cell phone is still the most universal — nearly every cell phone user makes calls on their phone at least occasionally.

  • The average adult cell phone owner makes and receives around five voice calls a day.
  • Women tend to make slightly fewer calls with their cell phones than men — while 53% of women make and receive five calls or fewer per day, 43% of men say the same. Men are a bit more likely to make slightly more phone calls in a day; 26% of men send and receive six to 10 calls a day, while 20% of women exchange that many calls. Men and women are equally likely to be represented at the extreme high end of callers, with 8% of men and 6% of women making and taking more than 30 calls a day.

Americans especially appreciate that their cell phones make them feel safer (91% of cell owners say this) and help them connect to friends and family to arrange plans (88% agree). Still, some users express irritation with their phone for the disruptions it creates, though the heaviest users of the phone are no more likely to express irritation with their phone than lower level users. Two-in-five (42%) cell phone owners say they feel irritated when a call or text message interrupts them. Cell phones are such a vital part of American’s lives that many users will not be parted from their device, even as they sleep:

  • 65% of adults with cell phones say they have ever slept with their cell phone on or right next to their bed.
  • Adults who have slept with or near their phones are also more likely to feel positively about their phone. They are more likely to appreciate the way the phone helps them to make plans (94% vs. 78% of those who don’t sleep with their phone) and to see the phone as a source of entertainment (52% vs. 14%). Phone sleepers are just as likely to express irritation with the phone as those who don’t sleep near their handset.

Spam isn’t just for email anymore; it comes in the form of unwanted text messages of all kinds — from coupons to phishing schemes — sent directly to user’s cell phones.

  • 57% of adults with cell phones have received unwanted or spam text messages on their phone.

African American and Hispanic cell phone users are more intense and frequent users of all of the phone’s capabilities than whites. Minorities send more text messages and make more calls on average than their white counterparts.

  • African American and English-speaking Hispanic adults are slightly more likely than whites to own a cell phone, with 87% of African Americans and English-speaking Hispanics owning a phone, compared with 80% of whites.
  • African American and English-speaking Hispanic cell phone owners are more likely than whites to initiate and receive large numbers of calls each day. One-in-eight (12%) Africa American phone owners and 14% of Hispanic cell phone users make and receive more than 30 calls on a typical day, while just 4% of white cell phone users make and receive the same number of calls.
  • African American and Hispanic texters typically text more on average than white texters, with a median of 10 texts a day for African Americans and Hispanics and 5 texts a day for whites. White adults are a bit more likely than English-speaking Hispanic adults to say they do not send or receive any texts on a typical day (10% vs. 4%).

Parents with children under age 18 in the home are also keen users of the cell phone. Parents are more likely to own a cell phone than non-parents, and more likely to make five or more calls per day than non-parents (63% vs. 44%), though they do not text more overall. They are more likely to have slept with their phone on or near their bed, and to use the phone for talking for all types of purposes. Texting is less definitive — mostly parents use it for the same reasons and similar frequencies as non-parents. Parents are also more likely than those without minor children at home to appreciate the way the phone allows them to check in, plan on the fly and stave off boredom.

  • Parents (90%) are more likely to have a cell phone than adults without children under 18 at home (78%).
  • 72% of parents have slept with their phone, compared with 62% of non-parents.
  • Parents are more likely to use their cell phone’s voice capabilities several times a day for work calls (32% of parents vs. 19% of non-parents), to check in with someone (28% vs. 17%), to say hello and chat (31% vs. 24%) and to have long personal conversations (13% vs. 7%) than are non-parents. Parents are also more likely than non-parents to coordinate a physical meeting (18% vs. 13%) daily.
data mining

I love data mining….as long as it isn’t my data being mined!

Having worked in social media since before it was called social media – i have quite a few friends and colleagues who have built entire companies around the idea of data mining. In 1994, when i started to work on overseeing the build of a consumer database for the first time, I remember the excitement around finally being able to communicate directly to people about things they would want to hear about.

Somewhere at some point someone had told me that the difference between marketing and sales was this: a salesperson sells you something you dont need and a marketer tells you about something you might like. I personally always liked to think of myself as the marketer. And then – email, the click to buy button, the add to cart button, conversion rates etc…marketers became sales people. one by one by one we fell. Yet – all this data mining – the ability to take all our junior sociologist/anthropologist tendencies and put them to actual work making money? How could you not! All those salespeople always asking what marketing people actually DID all day! Harumph!

I read the journal article linked at the end of this post and it really hit home for me. I’ve been shopping online for a dress to wear to a friend’s wedding. Rather than drive all over town, spend hours in traffic – i am that online shopper that fully takes advantage of free shipping and returns. My bedroom is the dressing room, the UPS man my personal helper that brings me another size or color.

I AM FREAKED OUT LATELY BECAUSE I AM BEING FOLLOWED ONLINE BY SHOES AND DRESSES AND COOKWARE.

I use like.com (not to be confused with ilike.com for music) – visual search shopping when you want to see every navy blue maxi length dress in the world? It’s amazing! Best deal on that particular marc jacobs dress or want to monitor the sale price of a cashmere sweater? Bow down to shopstyle. These are PHENOMENAL shopping/marketing/CRM tools.

But then – it happens. I go to a blog, i’m reading a hard core diatribe about some new technology and there in the corner…..a banner…..scrolling through black suede boots – the very shoes i was looking at yesterday — like the devil – like a stranger offering me candy at school!

I finally decided to click on the “i” for information on how in the world this company was achieving this. And it wasn’t just every once in a while…it was everything lately – i shopped for a gift of kitchenware, visions of all clad dancing in the corners, – it was anytime i did a search on anything it seemed.

I hated it. And I loved it.  Criteo.

You geniuses. You peeping Toms. how dare you peep while I am bra shopping online!  After clicking on the “i” in the banner ad I was told I could remove the Criteo tracking tool from my computer….after i downloaded a  PDF and spend a half hour removing it! This is so NOT the 2 clicks “unsubscribe me” button that we now take for granted to opt out of anything at any time quickly and easily (thank you DMA).

It was maddening – i didn’t have time to put on my “IT Guy” hat and dig into find the hidden file. It’s still there. Oh what the hell – I thought – I do this for a living I shouldn’t remove it – I need to understand.

I found the press release. It wasn’t just my paranoia – it WAS in fact happening more and more because on APril 9th, 2010 Criteo moved its offices from Paris France to Palo Alto. They hired 20 US salespeople. They have two US data centers.

And it’s working. And I’m waiting for the other shoe to drop. I want an unsubscribe button. Black pumps are a distraction I don’t need when I’m doing research on mobile video content delivery. I’d like to decide when I’m going to shop and when I’m going to work without having to spend a halfhour programming my computer for each site. Maybe even just a “not now” button in the corner of the banner.

I’m just not strong enough to ignore the shoes in the corner.

Here’s the article:

THE DANGERS OF WEB TRACKING – THE GREAT PRIVACY DEBATE BY NICOLAS CARR FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.