How insightful is the TPM measurement?

The world is talking about Michelle Obama and her 28k tweets per minute during her speech at the DNC2012. I can include myself as a participating tweeter. FLOTUS was phenomenal. John King on CNN made an off the cuff joke about Ms Obama signing up to run for anything…but it’s true. That speech was presidential in and of itself.

But the TPM statistic. I feel like it’s the early days of “hits” to a webpage. What does it mean? It’s a big number and people (the media especially) like big numbers. But truly. What are the uniques? I counted for ten tweets due to engaging conversations with fellow twits.

In terms of her volume compared to Mitt or Ann Romney? Of course it would be more! This is the First Lady whose staff has her on Pinterest posting behind the scenes photos of life at the White House. Her audience is social media saavy. Everyone is consistently talking about the Republican party as “the party of old white men” – I can tell you that if that is true – that particular demographic is NOT going to be tweeting during ANY speech at ANY volume even close to Michelle Obama’s audience.

I think the questions we could be asking are deeper than TPM and I am sure there are so many folks behind the scenes analyzing sentiment, and mentions on topics, using tools like Radian 6, Crimson Hexagon, Social Mention, People Browser. So sad that most of this data is confidential and will be used to draft political strategy.

If only the media cared about more than the TPM. Sigh. That would be news analysis. I did find one slightly obsessed group here. Thanks guys. Keep up the good work!

Click here for Politico’s Coverage of the Tweet Mania

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product development and marketing

Your Roadmap for Product Development and Marketing

This is a snapshot from a FANTASTIC report from Altimeter about Content Marketing and Development. As we move ahead and more and more companies are moving into the Content space (past the traditional press release or white paper) this map is a great thing to hang over your wall.  Does what you are planning to create (mobile app game? Mobile app informational service? blog? video series?) does it fit into one of these bubbles and more importantly; does it fit into the RIGHT bubble?

This is a great one to hang on the wall above the desk and look at during those conference calls about content strategy. Most people don’t really know what content can be – this can help!

You can download the full report here:

Altimeter

social media ROI

Great Points….thanks involver.com!

Three Social Media ROI Myths

Some social media marketing myths still persist despite the growing understanding of how to use the new marketing channels. Here are three of them.

Social Media is NOT free

1. Social media is free.

Signing up for a Facebook page or a YouTube channel may be free, but that doesn’t mean social media is. At the very least, successful social media content still takes time to plan and develop, and someone in the business is being paid for that time. However, the good news is that once a social media marketing strategy has been decided upon and people have been allocated to the project, the cost of social media remains relatively flat, while profitability increases over time. Whether or not profitability happens, though, totally depends upon the success of the social media campaign.

2. It’s impossible to assign a monetary ROI value to social media marketing.

Although marketers are still learning how to measure the ROI of social media efforts, stating that the monetary value of a social media campaign cannot be measured at all is not true. As you will see in the next section of this article, many businesses are already successfully measuring the dollar-value of their social initiatives.

3. Social media costs more than it makes.

This is a “myth” that is actually true–for businesses who are poorly executing social media campaigns because they don’t understand their audience, don’t understand their technical tools, or just don’t understand social media itself. Businesses who do not invest the time it takes to learn about their audience, how to grow that audience, and how to interact with that audience will ultimately spend more on social media than social media brings back to them, but this is not the fault of social media itself.

Six Examples of Social Media ROI

Want to see some recent concrete examples of businesses who are measuring the results of their social media campaigns? Try these on for size:

Social Media ROI

1. Best Buy’s innovative “Twelpforce” enlists knowledgeable, everyday employees to answer customer support questions via Twitter. Best Buy estimates that this “social help desk” saves them $5 million annually in support. [1]

2. Bonobo’s social business became 13 times more cost effective (CPA) in acquiring a new customer from Twitter than from other marketing channels. [2]

3. Paramount Pictures’ #Super8Secret (hashtag) Promoted Trend created a tremendous spike in conversations: Tweets of the hashtag reached nearly nine million impressions in less than 24 hours and mentions of the movie skyrocketed to more than 150 per minute. Receipts for the sneak preview exceeded $1 million, and Paramount said weekend box office surpassed expectations by 52%. [2]

4. Petco’s 1% of shoppers use “Ask and Answer,” that influences a 10% increase of revenue on their website. [3]

5. Sprint’s monitoring of online conversations about their brand enabled them to tweak their social media campaign messaging. As a result, the company says it picked up an extra $133 million in revenue. [4]

6. Sephora Community Users spend 2.5 times more than average customers, and their superfans spend 10 times more. [1]

it’s so funny how we don’t talk anymore

Pew’s latest information on texting shows that adults are increasing in their use of texting. Some of the subtleties are fascinating. Love the question “do you sleep with your phone” (parents do so more than non parents) There is a definite difference between parents and non parents usage that is interesting but also confusing at times. take a look. One thing is for sure – kids are forcing their parents to communicate with them on their terms – and that’s via text.

Adults, Cell Phones and Texting

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Overview

Texting by adults has increased over the past nine months from 65% of adults sending and receiving texts in September 2009 to 72% texting in May 2010. Still, adults do not send nearly the same number of texts per day as teens ages 12-17, who send and receive, on average, five times more texts per day than adult texters.

  • Adults who text typically send and receive a median of 10 texts a day; teens who text send and receive a median of 50 texts per day.
  • 5% of all adult texters send more than 200 text messages a day or more than 6,000 texts a month. Fully 15% of teens ages 12-17, and 18% of adults ages 18 to 24 text message more than 200 messages a day, while just 3% of adults ages 25 to 29 do the same.
  • Heavy adult texters — those who send and receive more than 50 texts a day — also tend to be heavy users of voice calling. Light texters, who exchange one to 10 texts a day, do not make up for less texting by calling more. Instead, they are light users of both calling and texting.

The original purpose of the cell phone is still the most universal — nearly every cell phone user makes calls on their phone at least occasionally.

  • The average adult cell phone owner makes and receives around five voice calls a day.
  • Women tend to make slightly fewer calls with their cell phones than men — while 53% of women make and receive five calls or fewer per day, 43% of men say the same. Men are a bit more likely to make slightly more phone calls in a day; 26% of men send and receive six to 10 calls a day, while 20% of women exchange that many calls. Men and women are equally likely to be represented at the extreme high end of callers, with 8% of men and 6% of women making and taking more than 30 calls a day.

Americans especially appreciate that their cell phones make them feel safer (91% of cell owners say this) and help them connect to friends and family to arrange plans (88% agree). Still, some users express irritation with their phone for the disruptions it creates, though the heaviest users of the phone are no more likely to express irritation with their phone than lower level users. Two-in-five (42%) cell phone owners say they feel irritated when a call or text message interrupts them. Cell phones are such a vital part of American’s lives that many users will not be parted from their device, even as they sleep:

  • 65% of adults with cell phones say they have ever slept with their cell phone on or right next to their bed.
  • Adults who have slept with or near their phones are also more likely to feel positively about their phone. They are more likely to appreciate the way the phone helps them to make plans (94% vs. 78% of those who don’t sleep with their phone) and to see the phone as a source of entertainment (52% vs. 14%). Phone sleepers are just as likely to express irritation with the phone as those who don’t sleep near their handset.

Spam isn’t just for email anymore; it comes in the form of unwanted text messages of all kinds — from coupons to phishing schemes — sent directly to user’s cell phones.

  • 57% of adults with cell phones have received unwanted or spam text messages on their phone.

African American and Hispanic cell phone users are more intense and frequent users of all of the phone’s capabilities than whites. Minorities send more text messages and make more calls on average than their white counterparts.

  • African American and English-speaking Hispanic adults are slightly more likely than whites to own a cell phone, with 87% of African Americans and English-speaking Hispanics owning a phone, compared with 80% of whites.
  • African American and English-speaking Hispanic cell phone owners are more likely than whites to initiate and receive large numbers of calls each day. One-in-eight (12%) Africa American phone owners and 14% of Hispanic cell phone users make and receive more than 30 calls on a typical day, while just 4% of white cell phone users make and receive the same number of calls.
  • African American and Hispanic texters typically text more on average than white texters, with a median of 10 texts a day for African Americans and Hispanics and 5 texts a day for whites. White adults are a bit more likely than English-speaking Hispanic adults to say they do not send or receive any texts on a typical day (10% vs. 4%).

Parents with children under age 18 in the home are also keen users of the cell phone. Parents are more likely to own a cell phone than non-parents, and more likely to make five or more calls per day than non-parents (63% vs. 44%), though they do not text more overall. They are more likely to have slept with their phone on or near their bed, and to use the phone for talking for all types of purposes. Texting is less definitive — mostly parents use it for the same reasons and similar frequencies as non-parents. Parents are also more likely than those without minor children at home to appreciate the way the phone allows them to check in, plan on the fly and stave off boredom.

  • Parents (90%) are more likely to have a cell phone than adults without children under 18 at home (78%).
  • 72% of parents have slept with their phone, compared with 62% of non-parents.
  • Parents are more likely to use their cell phone’s voice capabilities several times a day for work calls (32% of parents vs. 19% of non-parents), to check in with someone (28% vs. 17%), to say hello and chat (31% vs. 24%) and to have long personal conversations (13% vs. 7%) than are non-parents. Parents are also more likely than non-parents to coordinate a physical meeting (18% vs. 13%) daily.
data mining

I love data mining….as long as it isn’t my data being mined!

Having worked in social media since before it was called social media – i have quite a few friends and colleagues who have built entire companies around the idea of data mining. In 1994, when i started to work on overseeing the build of a consumer database for the first time, I remember the excitement around finally being able to communicate directly to people about things they would want to hear about.

Somewhere at some point someone had told me that the difference between marketing and sales was this: a salesperson sells you something you dont need and a marketer tells you about something you might like. I personally always liked to think of myself as the marketer. And then – email, the click to buy button, the add to cart button, conversion rates etc…marketers became sales people. one by one by one we fell. Yet – all this data mining – the ability to take all our junior sociologist/anthropologist tendencies and put them to actual work making money? How could you not! All those salespeople always asking what marketing people actually DID all day! Harumph!

I read the journal article linked at the end of this post and it really hit home for me. I’ve been shopping online for a dress to wear to a friend’s wedding. Rather than drive all over town, spend hours in traffic – i am that online shopper that fully takes advantage of free shipping and returns. My bedroom is the dressing room, the UPS man my personal helper that brings me another size or color.

I AM FREAKED OUT LATELY BECAUSE I AM BEING FOLLOWED ONLINE BY SHOES AND DRESSES AND COOKWARE.

I use like.com (not to be confused with ilike.com for music) – visual search shopping when you want to see every navy blue maxi length dress in the world? It’s amazing! Best deal on that particular marc jacobs dress or want to monitor the sale price of a cashmere sweater? Bow down to shopstyle. These are PHENOMENAL shopping/marketing/CRM tools.

But then – it happens. I go to a blog, i’m reading a hard core diatribe about some new technology and there in the corner…..a banner…..scrolling through black suede boots – the very shoes i was looking at yesterday — like the devil – like a stranger offering me candy at school!

I finally decided to click on the “i” for information on how in the world this company was achieving this. And it wasn’t just every once in a while…it was everything lately – i shopped for a gift of kitchenware, visions of all clad dancing in the corners, – it was anytime i did a search on anything it seemed.

I hated it. And I loved it.  Criteo.

You geniuses. You peeping Toms. how dare you peep while I am bra shopping online!  After clicking on the “i” in the banner ad I was told I could remove the Criteo tracking tool from my computer….after i downloaded a  PDF and spend a half hour removing it! This is so NOT the 2 clicks “unsubscribe me” button that we now take for granted to opt out of anything at any time quickly and easily (thank you DMA).

It was maddening – i didn’t have time to put on my “IT Guy” hat and dig into find the hidden file. It’s still there. Oh what the hell – I thought – I do this for a living I shouldn’t remove it – I need to understand.

I found the press release. It wasn’t just my paranoia – it WAS in fact happening more and more because on APril 9th, 2010 Criteo moved its offices from Paris France to Palo Alto. They hired 20 US salespeople. They have two US data centers.

And it’s working. And I’m waiting for the other shoe to drop. I want an unsubscribe button. Black pumps are a distraction I don’t need when I’m doing research on mobile video content delivery. I’d like to decide when I’m going to shop and when I’m going to work without having to spend a halfhour programming my computer for each site. Maybe even just a “not now” button in the corner of the banner.

I’m just not strong enough to ignore the shoes in the corner.

Here’s the article:

THE DANGERS OF WEB TRACKING – THE GREAT PRIVACY DEBATE BY NICOLAS CARR FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.

Metric Crisis (as if there aren’t enough crises happening!)

Found this posting in mediaweek to be quite interesting. i had a long conversation with Russ Crupnick from NPD on Thursday and it was all around metrics. Russ’s co measures consumer opinion and tracks quite a bit of sales data; mapping psychology with sales.  We discussed the idea of measurement at length; and the new ways of measuring “engagement”.

So many new companies out there that measure the value of product integrations, the value of a consumer engagement, but so much of the attitude is still about the “big number”.  We still aren’t to the point where folks want to accept a smaller number with more meaning. The right 25,000 people instead of the wrong 2.5 million.

One of my favorite new co’s over the past few years is a company called divinity metrics; my friend and colleague mark levy is on their board. their measurement tools are incredible, the dashboards easy to use, the tracking phenomenal….the numbers are real, but inventing new benchmarks is a tough role to play during the “crisis”. You are lauded and despised all at once!

i don’t think we have gone back five years as someone is quoted below…but if we don’t accept the newer terms, the newer ideas and educate, educate, educate – we will be stuck in this place for the next 5 years; which isn’t something the world can afford.  Keep moving ahead…new day, new tools, new numbers. 

 

From Mediaweek

Updated: Crisis in Metrics, Say Digital Media Execs

May 6, 2009

-By Mike Shields

mw/photos/stylus/66261-HandonComputerM.jpg The most measurable medium’s metrics are a major mess.

That’s according to a group of digital media executives who participated in a measurement-themed panel session on Wednesday (May 6) at the Interactive Media Conference (hosted by Editor & Publisher and Mediaweek) in New Orleans. Jason Kint, senior vp, general manager, CBSSports.com, was particularly frank when asked about the state of online measurement, saying that the industry “has gone backwards in the past five years. There is a real crisis in metrics right now.”

A major source of the crisis, said Kint, is the proliferation of newer research sources that, while aiming to improve metrics, have only made things more confusing. For example, he mentioned the increasingly common practice buyers and sellers blending together panel-based figures from companies like Nielsen and comScore with data from analytics companies like Compete and Google, which can lead to inaccurate comparisons and conclusions. “It gets pretty crazy,” he said.

Another problem that stems from the Web’s inherent trackability, according to Christy Tanner, editor in chief and vp, marketing, TV Guide, is that too many publishers get fixated on driving up the measures that advertisers care about, such as page-views—without considering their site’s user experience. “If everything you do is based on [driving] advertiser metrics, you’re gonna lose your users,” she said.

CBSSports.com has tried to steer the conversation away from page-views and click-throughs toward time spent and user engagement (areas where it excels), but it has sometimes found it difficult to break ingrained habits, according to Kint. “A lot of the younger media buyers are looking at page-views and CPMs and click-through rates,” he said. “That’s what they are negotiating on.”

But to him, page-views have become “irrelevant.” He cited an example of a bracket tool that CBSSports.com launched earlier this year during the men’s NCAA basketball tournament. The tool proved to be popular among users, but because of the way it was designed—its content loaded on the site dynamically—it actually drove page-views down for that time period.

Video is in an even more challenged position, according to the panelists, since standards are lacking for even the most basic measures such as what constitutes a true video “view.”  Thus, the fast growing sector is subject to “bogus numbers,” offered Kint.

Online video syndication—an increasingly popular strategy for content creators–is particularly difficult to track, said Tanner. “We are not there yet with a really simple solution to track content on third parties,” she said. “What we really need is one analytics tool that tracks on-site traffic as well as the variety of syndicated products that we distribute, including video, widgets and other syndicated products.”

Yet another measurement challenge identified during Wednesday’s panel was clients’ increased desire for more custom ad packages. Those often require conducting proprietary research in order for sites to prove their value. And even then, not everything that is new and different can easily be benchmarked. Tanner cited the example of some TV advertisers looking to track chatter about particular shows–chatter that happens either off TV Guide’s site or on social platforms like Twitter. Often, “these are things you can’t measure or that may end up looking bad,” she said.

Did You Know?

a team put together this AMAZING video of facts, figures and tidbits that I cannot stop thinking about – and showing to everyone I know.  It really is phenomenal and everytime I watch it – It just makes me stop and think, what could I be doing differently, better, less of, more of – what should WE all be doing differently, less of, more of…there are so many dots to be connected inside this 5 minute piece…

enjoy.